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1967 Corvette Art Prints

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Illustrated Corvette Series No. 172
1967 L98 427Corvette - "The Best C2 Sting Ray?"
To read the story, CLICK HERE.

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Illustrated Corvette Series II No. 172
1967 Corvette
"The Best C2 Sting Ray?"

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llustrated Corvette Series II
No. 172 1967 Corvette
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Illustrated Corvette Series No. 29
1967 Corvette
To read the story, CLICK HERE.

Illustrated Corvette Series No. 158
1967 FS&O 427 Corvette
Bob Wingate's V.I.P. Special
To read the story, CLICK HERE.
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Illustrated Corvette Series II
No. 29
1967 Corvette

Illustrated Corvette Series No. 158
1967 FS&O 427 Corvette
Bob Wingate's V.I.P. Special
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llustrated Corvette Series II
No. 29 1967 Corvette

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llustrated Corvette Series No. 158
1967 FS&O 427 Corvette
Bob Wingate's V.I.P. Special
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Illustrated Corvette Series No. 129
1967 L-88 Corvette Drag Racer
"In Memory of Astoria-Chas"
To read the story, CLICK HERE.

Illustrated Corvette Series No. 131
'67 - '69 L-88 Corvette Racers
"Bringing Back Racing Respect"

To read the story, CLICK HERE.
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Illustrated Corvette Series II No. 129
1967 L-88 Corvette Drag Racer
"In Memory of Astoria-Chas"

Illustrated Corvette Series II No. 131
'67 - '69 L-88 Corvette Racers
"Bringing Back Racing Respect"
11x17 Parchment Paper Print
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Illustrated Corvette Series II No. 129
1967 L-88 Corvette Drag Racer
"In Memory of Astoria-Chas"

Illustrated Corvette Series II No. 131
'67 - '69 L-88 Corvette Racers
"Bringing Back Racing Respect"
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lllustrated Corvette Series No. 30
1967 L-88 Corvette
To read the story, CLICK HERE.

Illustrated Corvette Series No. 131
'67 - '69 L-88 Corvette Racers
"Bringing Back Racing Respect"
To read the story, CLICK HERE.
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1967 L88 Racer - C2-10

1967 L-88 Sunray DX C2-18
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Guldstrand 1967 L-88 - C2-17

1967 427 Corvette Roadster - C2-9
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1967 427 Corvette WRECK! - C2-8

1967 427 Corvette Coupe Profile
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1967 - 1967 L71 427/435 427 ENG-4

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1967 - 1967 L71 427/435 427
LZ-ENG-4
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1967 L-88 Corvette Drag Racer
"In Memory of Astoria-Chas"
Profile Print

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Here's the story:
Illustrated Corvette Series No. 172 - 1967 L89 427 Corvette
"The Best C2 Sting Ray?"

In March of ‘65 GM’s styling VP, Bill Mitchell blew everyone away with his Mako Shark II concept car. The new shark just had to be the next Corvette. Management was so excited, they tried to get the rebodied Sting Ray completed as a ‘67 model - a totally unrealistic goal. When it was obvious that the new design wouldn’t make it in time to be a ‘67 model, stylists were tasked to give the existing Sting Ray one last pass.

The stylists came back with subtle changes that made the ‘67 Corvette totally unique. Most obvious was the new five-louver front fender vents and the 15x6-inch steel rally wheels with their beauty rings and caps, the backup light was relocated just above the license plates, and a closer look revealed that the fender badges were gone. Since ‘65, big-block Vettes could easily be spotted by the domed hood. Big-block ‘67 Corvettes received the new “Stinger” hood scoop, which is arguably the most popular performance car hood scoop of all time. While not functional, except for the L88 racing version, it just flat-out looks great! The interior had slightly revised seat patterns and door panels, the passenger-side dash grab bar was gone and a center-mounted parking brake added. The suspension and drive train was unchanged, however, the Kelsey-Hayes knock-off cast-aluminum wheels were redesigned for a regular 5-lug pattern. Knock-offs and spinners were deemed unsafe by the government.

The big news was under the hood. Two small-blocks were available, the base 300-HP engine and the $105, 350-HP L79 327. But it was the selection of big-blocks that made jaws drop. With five 427s to choose from, the question was, “how much horsepower would you like and how much money do you have?” The L36 390-HP engine was unchanged from ‘66. Now we get to the good stuff. The L68 427 was an L36 equipped with the new 3x2 carb setup. Three, 2-bbl carb setups had been optional on Pontiacs since ‘56. What made the Chevrolet version unique was the vacuum-opperated second and third carbs. For normal driving, only the center, 300 cfm 2-bbl carb was used. But for passing, going up hills, or “spirited driving,” the remaining two carbs would gradually open up, providing a turbine-like whoosh of horsepower.

For a performance car, it was the best of both worlds. Next in the feeding chain was the $437 427/435 L71 that became an instant legend. Hot Rod magazine got 13.80 ets from the L71 and CARS Magazine got a Motion Performance, dyno tuned version with tall gearing to run 12.90s! And for those that wanted a Corvette with plenty of red meat to go racing, Duntov made sure his latest, $947 L88 racer kit provided a solid base to build a competitive Corvette racer.

But it was the aluminum head-equipped, L89 optional engine that never got it’s due. Think, L71 with its solid-lifters, 11.0:1 compression, 3x2 carb setup - minus 75 pounds off the front end. All three of the 3x2 427s came with the big, triangular air fliter for maximun airflow and bragging rights. Car and Driver noted a front-to-rear weight ratio of 47/53, while a small-block scaled in at 46/54. Plus, the L89 427 only weighed 40-pounds more than a small-block. And then there was the price. The L89 “aluminum heads” was a $368 option, on top of the $437 L71, making the entire package a $805 option!

The L89 option continued on in ‘68 as a $805 option and then $832 in ‘69. Out of a total of 90,268 Corvettes built from ‘67 to ‘69, only 1,030 were L89s. Then for ‘70, the LT-2 was supposed to be a 454 version of the L88, but the project was canceled. Aluminum heads wouldn’t go into a production Corvette again until ‘85 with the tuned-port, fuel-injected L98. While it was all a step in the right direction, unless you were into some serious racing, the street performance was hardly noticeable. One magazine tested a L89 and ran 13.7s, just 1/10th quicker than a L71 Corvette. With only 16 L89s made in ‘67, they are the rarest of the ‘67 Sting Rays. Only 20 L88 ‘67 Corvettes were built.

A maxed out L89 Vette cost just over $7,000, while a nicely equipped ‘67 Corvette with the base 300-HP 327 could be bought for around $5,000. It’s really too bad that all-aluminum engines weren’t introduced into production sooner than ‘97 with the LS1. The notion of a 435-horsepower big-block Corvette weighing as much as a cast-iron 327 is very tantalizing and the stuff of serious bench racing. Kind of like today’s ZR1. - KST


Here's the story:
Illustrated Corvette Series No. 158 - 1967 FS&O 427 Corvette
"Bob Wingate's V.I.P. Special"

In the ‘50s and ’60s, GM had a system for taking care of its top people. Presidents, VPs, high-level managers, and other VIP types often got new cars that were specially made vehicles. These were generically called “SO”—for “Special Order” or “Shop Order”—cars. Another term was “F&SO,” for “Fleet & Special Order.” About 25 to 50 or so of these cars were made each year. However, it was unusual for a car salesman to get one. But Bob Wingate of Clippinger Chevrolet, in Covina, California wasn’t just a good car salesman. He was “Mr. Corvette.”

Wingate started at Clippinger Chevrolet in 1955 as a prep guy—the fellow who cleans the cars prior to delivery. His favorite cars to prep were Corvettes. After a few years, he worked his way into sales, and before long, he was selling more Corvettes than anyone else in California. What got Chevrolet sales managers’ attention was when Wingate ordered 100 ‘62 Corvettes for the dealership. Chevrolet had only sold 10,939 Corvettes in ’61, so they wondered, “Who is this guy?” Upper management was reluctant to send that many cars, but Chevy’s Joe Pike believed in Wingate and was not disappointed. Wingate became the highest volume Corvette salesman in ‘62 and by ’66 had sold more Corvettes than any other salesman. Chevrolet thanked Wingate by giving him the Legion of Leaders award. His reputation even got the attention of Ford’s Lee Iacocca, who offered him a job doing the same kind of work for Mustang and Cobra sales. He declined, and when Joe Pike found out, Wingate got a raise and an F&SO Corvette. He was told, “Pick what you want.”

Most people know about the car shown here, but there was actually car before this one. In the fall of 1966, Bob got a pearl green ’67 427 Coupe with fender flares, a chrome tube grille, wide Goodyear tires, American Racing mags, and a custom interior. The car was a looker, and Wingate’s soon customers began asking if they could get their Vettes tricked out like his. The car was a bit of a problem in this regard, so it was replaced with something a little more tame.

Still, the replacement car was stunning. Painted Greenwood Green, it had a white stripe that started on top of the 427 hood scoop and ran over the top and back. Six taillights adorned the back, and the front bumpers were removed. Torq-Thrust mag with Goodyear Blue Streak tires and white brake calipers filled the stock wheelwells. The hood had hand-applied “427” numbering, and a Nardi steering wheel dressed up the black interior. Factory options included the L71 427/435 engine, power windows and brakes, an AM/FM radio, tinted glass, a shoulder harness, side pipes, a wide-ratio 4-speed, and a 3.55:1 Posi-traction rear. Wingate recalls the body being “perfect.”

Wingate had his name applied to the top edge of the door and a Clippinger Chevrolet logo on the lower part. For the next year, when he wasn’t selling Corvettes, he was doing goodwill work for the dealership all over the Southwest, attending car shows, autocross races, and drag races.

While the car was owned by the dealership, Wingate’s deal was that he could sell the car and keep the money as his yearend bonus. The new C3s were about to arrive, so he sold the car to a young fellow who promptly blew up the engine. Later, Wingate learned that his F&SO Vette had been smashed when a truck ran into it while it was parked on I-10 after running out of gas. Oh well.

Twenty-five years later, Californian Bob Radke found a ‘67 coupe that had been customized with fender flares and a rear spoiler and was in very bad condition. After the usual back-and-forth negotiations, Radke bought the car. When he checked the tank sticker, he noticed the designation “COPO/F&SO” and the notation “Build Per FSO.” Radke had a very rare machine. After some research, he learned that the original owner had been Bob Wingate, the “Corvette Guy.” Radke and Wingate became friends, and Wingate’s collection of over 100 photos were instrumental in Radke’s restoration of the car. The seven-year resto took the car back to when it was delivered to Wingate, the day before Thanksgiving 1966.

VIP Corvettes have become hot collector cars, and Radke hasn’t indicated that he’s anywhere close to being ready to part with this beauty.


Here's the story:
Illustrated Corvette Series No. 131 - '67 - '69 L-88 Racers
"Bringing Back Racing Respect"

Every Corvette owner had a best friend in Zora Arkus-Duntov, Chief of Engineering for the Vette from ‘56 to ’75. Duntov created a foundation of uncompromising performance for the GM’s flagship sports car. Were it not for his personal racing experience and his never-ending push for improvement, GM surely would have axed the car early on. Even better, Duntov always made sure racers had plenty of hot parts for their Corvettes.

The ‘63 Sting Ray should have put the Corvette ahead of the competition, but with the advent of the Shelby Cobra and the death of the Grand Sport, the Vette remained outgunned until the arrival of the big-block in ’65. It took two years for Duntov to sort out the details, but his latest Corvette stealth bomber—the ‘67 L88—was worth the wait.

While an L88 Corvette was some 900 pounds heavier than a ‘63 Grand Sport, Duntov nevertheless took the car as far as he could for a production vehicle. Make no mistake: The L88 Vettes were one tick away from being all-out race cars. As everyday drivers, they were all but unusable, just the way Duntov wanted it. Here’s why.

By the mid-’60s the Detroit horsepower wars were in full swing. Hot-rodders and wannabe racers were buying anything with big power numbers. While the solid-lifter, big-block Chevys were beasts for the street, the L88 was designed for one thing: racing. Not only was the L-88 stealthy in appearance, it looked like a second-rate performer on the order sheet. Most obvious was the power rating of 430 horsepower—five less than the 427/435 L71. And creature comforts? Fuggetaboutit! The L88 had a special “delete option” that removed items such as the heater, the radio, the A/C, and the radiator shroud. The engine had aluminum heads, a radical cam, a huge four-barrel carb, 12:1 compression, a 103-octane fuel requirement, and a 2,000-rpm idle. With open headers and a sharp tune, an L88 could generate over 600 hp.

Duntov made sure that the car’s underpinnings were also race-ready. The F41 suspension included stiffer shocks and springs, front and rear anti-sway bars, and racing brakes. Fender flares to cover racing tires were included in the trunk. The engine option alone cost $947, and when the other mandatory options were added, buyers were looking at least a 50 percent increase over the car’s base price, making the L88 package the most expensive Corvette to date. In keeping with the package’s low-profile nature, no special badges were added. During the three years the option was offered—’67 through ’69—only 216 L88s were ordered.

The L-88 delivered the goods on the track. The ‘67 Sunray DX and the ’68 Garner A.I.R. Corvettes were good examples of what these cars could do when treated to some well-executed race-prep work. Sunray Oil Company sponsored a pre-production ‘67 L88 Corvette with the help of Don Yenko. Three weeks after Yenko took delivery, the car was on the starting grid for the 12 Hours of Sebring. Driven by Yenko and Dave Morgan, the Sunray Vette smashed the GT class track record, won First in class, and Tenth overall. At the ‘68 24 Hours at Daytona race, the car ran 194 mph on the high-banked track, thanks to some special 2.60:1 gearing from Chevrolet.

The James Garner American International Racing team (A.I.R.) took delivery of three ’68 L88 Corvettes that were then driven from St. Louis to Culver City, California. With help from Dick Guldstrand, two of the cars were prepared for the 24 Hours at Daytona. Car No. 44 finished the race but was sold soon afterward when the team switched to Lola T70 Mk II coupes. Many years and many racers later, the car was completely restored. It occasionally runs at historic races.

The most aggressive and successful of the L88 Corvettes was the Owen-Corning Fiberglass car of Tony DeLorenzo and Jerry Thompson. Although not a numbers-matching L88 car, this all-out A/Production racer racked up 22 straight class wins, qualified on the pole at most of its races, and won two national championships. At the end of ’71, OCF decided that they had gotten enough out of racing and pulled the sponsorship.

Duntov envisioned a much lighter car, but the L88 package proved that with 600-plus hp and suspension parts to back it up, the Corvette once again had a fighting chance on the race track. - K. Scott Teeters


Here's the story:
Illustrated Corvette Series No. 129 - 1967 L-88 Corvette Drag Racer
"Bringing Back Racing Respect"

From its earliest days, drag racing was the little guy’s motorsport. Shade-tree mechanics wrenched on their street cars during the week and competed at their local drag strip on the weekend. The tale of Charley Snyder’s “KO Motion” L88 ‘67 Corvette reads like the Buddy Holly story of drag racing.

During the late ’60s, Long Island, New York was a hotbed of musclecar activity. Motion Performance owner Joel Rosen had a sweet deal with the owners of the local Chevy dealer, Baldwin Chevrolet. Rosen was building brand-new Chevy Phase III supercars while his business partner and friend, Marty Schorr, then editor of CARS magazine, kept Chevy fans drooling with a continuous stream of articles about Motion’s street and strip activities. These were very exciting times for high performance street cars.

Charley “Chas” Snyder was a local guy who lived in Astoria, New York, just a few miles from Rosen’s operation. In February ‘67, the 19-year-old Snyder took delivery of a new Marlboro Maroon 427 Corvette roadster. He took the car straight to Rosen’s shop for some serious tweaking. It wasn’t long before Snyder’s Vette was winning races at both the local strip and the late-night street-racing scene on Connecting Highway in Queens.

Unfortunately, Rosen’s enhancements proved to be more than Duntov envisioned when designing the frame of the C2 Sting Ray. The twisted chassis was replaced with a new gusset-welded unit, and a fresh L88 427 engine was installed.

Shortly after the car was worked over, Snyder, by then 20, was drafted into the Army. His racing exploits now fell in between his Army duties. Rosen was putting every trick in the book into the KO Motion car and had it running solid low 11s. Snyder ultimately volunteered for Airborne Ranger training and was sent to Vietnam in the spring of ‘68. One month after his arrival, he was killed by a mortar round.

Needless to say, the Snyder family and his friends at Motion Performance were devastated. A year later, Rosen and driver John Mahler got permission from Chas’ mother, Grace, to continue racing the L88 Vette with the objectiv of winning the national record for Chas. When Rosen was ready for the AHRA record run, the L88 was chock-full of the hottest parts from Chevrolet and the after market. The L88 was balanced and blueprinted, and its bottom end was beefed up. Modified aluminum heads, a performance camshaft, an 850-cfm Holley double-pumper, Hooker headers, 4.88 rear gears, a Hurst shifter, and 10-inch slicks were added. With Bill Foster at the wheel, Snyder’s L88 took the AHRA A/Corvette national record with an 11.04 e.t. at 129 mph. The official listing in the record book reads, “In Memory of Astoria Chas.” Later, Mahler ran a 10.47 at a local track The car was then trailered to Snyder’s sister’s house, garaged, and covered for the next 31 years!

Long Island businessman Glen Spielberg was just eight years old when he first saw the KO Motion car and knew he just had to have it. After three decades, the Snyder family finally agreed to sell the car to Spielberg on the condition that he would not restore or modify it. Today, the car is as it was the last day it was raced. The Buddy Holly of Corvettes lives on.
- K. Scott Teeters


Here's the story:
Illustrated Corvette Series No. 29 - 1967 Corvette - "The Finished Sting Ray"

Sometimes unexpected efforts turn out the best. Such is the case with the 1967 Corvette. It is common for designers to be working on the next generation as soon as a new model comes out. As the 1963 Sting Ray was being shown, Bill Mitchell and his team of top designers were working on the Sting Ray's replacement.

The new Corvette was supposed to be released as a 1966 model. The Mako Shark had unexpected problems that had to be solved, in addition to internal directional struggles. Zora Arkus-Duntov wanted a mid-engine Corvette while Bill Mitchell pushed his Mako Shark II design. Although the Mako Shark II was a smash hit on the show car circuit, the car suffered from front end lift and Duntov didn't like the reduced visibility the sexy, budging front fenders created. Mitchell won the layout battle and toned down the styling while Duntov's team made the Mako Shark II styling into a real car.

Performance hounds went ga-ga over the 1967 Corvette, especially the 427 / 435 horsepower version. Visually, the '67 model was clean as can be. Gone were the fake vents, scoops, and badges. Front fender vents featured five angled slots and the big-block had an aggressive looking hood scoop. Hub caps were replaced with five-slot, 6-inch, steel rally wheels with chrome beauty rings and caps.

The 427 /435 engine was premo! Carburation used three two-barrel carbs with a progressive, vacuum operated linkage that only used the center two-barrel carburetor for normal driving. If you put your boot into it, the remaining two carburetors cranked out amazing power. With the right rears and a four-speed, quarter-mile times in the 13s were standard, with a top speed of 140+ mph! Every possible performance option was available. Chevy sold 22,940 cars, costing over $5,000 each.

Although more 1966 cars were sold, 27,720, the 1967 427/435 model is one of the most valued cars in Corvette history. - K. Scott Teeters


Here's the story:
lllustrated Corvette Series No. 30 1967 L-88 Corvette - "Monster Vette!"

After four years of chasing Cobras, Duntov and his crew knew that they had to do something to put the Corvette back in the winner's circle. Endurance racing was the pinnacle of sports car racing. So the sights of Chevrolet were set on the 1967 24 Hours at Le Mans in France. Thus, the L88 legend was born.

The L88 was so close to being an all-out race car that Duntov deliberately had the engine rated at 430 horsepower at a low 5,200 rpm. The true rating was 460 horsepower at 6,400 rpm. With open headers, 103 octane gas and a few other tricks, the power was over 500. This kept unknowing performance hounds from checking off the option with the highest figure. All creature comforts were missing. There was no heater, defroster, radio, power steering, windows or radiator shroud. A/C was not available either. The J56 brake option was required with competition-only brake pads. Also mandatory was the F41 special suspension, and the M22 "rock crusher" four-speed transmission. From 1967 to 1969 only 216 L88 optioned Corvettes were built.

Details of the L88 were exotic stuff for 1967. Using the same four-bolt main cast iron block as the street Corvette, all sorts of special parts were added. The forged steel crank was cross-drilled and tuftrided. Rods were shot-peened and magnafluxed. The forged aluminum pistons had 12.5:1-compression.

The L88 used a radical camshaft and solid lifters. Up top was an aluminum high-rise intake manifold with a huge 830-cfm Holley four-barrel. The entire valvetrain was heavy duty and a K66 ignition was used. Also there was an aluminum radiator and a special cold-air hood scoop. The sexiest parts were the aluminum heads.

Dick Guldstrand, Bob Bondurant and Don Yenko drove a specially built L88 at Le Mans, hitting 171.5 mph on the Mulsanne straight! While leading the GT class, one of the stock wrist pins broke at the 11-1/2 hour mark , putting the L88 out of the race. Guldstrand commented, "Nobody was getting in your way... we showed them the short way around the track."
- K. Scott Teeters


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